March 28 – When a Solar Eclipse Stopped a Battle


May 28, 585 BC – According to the ancient Greek historian and geographer Herodotus, a solar eclipse occurred, as predicted by the Greek philosopher and scientist Thales of Miletus. The eclipse was interpreted as an omen, which stopped a battle between the Medes and the Lydians, who agreed to a truce. This is one of the cardinal dates from which other dates can be calculated.



 

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Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

May 27, 2016Barack Obama became the first U.S. president to visit Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park and meet surviving victims of the 1945 bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, known as Hibakusha (“explosion-affected people”). He called for a nuclear-free future “in which Hiroshima and Nagasaki are not known as the dawn of atomic warfare, but as the start of our own moral awakening.”


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The Golden Gate Bridge

May 26, 1937San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge opens after five years of construction, for Pedestrian Day – 200,000 walkers marvel at the 42,000-foot-long suspension bridge. It opens for vehicles the following day

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TCS: Two Poets, One Day Apart, Six Poems

Good Morning!

______________________________

Welcome to The Coffee Shop, just for you early risers
on Monday mornings. This is an Open Thread forum,
so if you have an off-topic opinion burning a hole in
your brainpan, feel free to add a comment.

______________________________

We have to create another language,
we have to find another starting point

– Rosario Castellanos

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A Poem for World Turtle Day

This piece has been updated. It was originally posted May 23, 2018.

May 23rd is World Turtle Day, which was founded in 1990 and is sponsored by American Tortoise Rescue.

Mary Oliver (1935-2019 ) prolific American poet who was born in Ohio, and won both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. The New York Times called her “America’s best-selling poet.”

To read Mary Oliver’s poem “The Turtle” click

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Two Poems for World Bee Day

We are bees, and our body is a honeycomb.
We made the body, cell by cell we made it.

– Rumi (1207-1273)


Today is World Bee Day.  On this day in 1734, Anton Janša was born in Carniola (now part of Slovenia). He was a painter, author, and a pioneer in beekeeping, who wrote A Full guide to Beekeeping and Discussion on Beekeeping 

There is an ongoing global decline in honeybees. I was going to begin with a round-up of the facts and statistics on this crisis, but they depressed me so much, I decided no one should have to start their Monday morning reading them.

So let’s just celebrate all 20,000 species of bees, even though most of them don’t make honey, or dance. In the U.S. alone, there are over 4,000 species of native bees, but the western honey bee (Apis mellifera) is an immigrant from Europe. 

To read the bee poems. click

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Fragments of a Life: Lorraine Hansberry

This post is slightly revised. It was originally published May 19, 2020.


Lorraine Hansberry (1930-1965) was born on this day, May 19. She was 34 years old when she died after a two-year fight with pancreatic cancer. She is remembered for her first play, A Raisin in the Sun, which opened on Broadway in 1959, just six years before her death – and sometimes for her memoir, which was the inspiration for Nina Simone’s song of the same title, To Be Young, Gifted and Black.

To read excerpts from Lorraine Hansberry’s To Be Young, Gifted and Black, click here:

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TCS: Then We Are Dreaming the Same Dream

Good Morning!

______________________________

Welcome to The Coffee Shop, just for you early risers
on Monday mornings. This is an Open Thread forum,
so if you have an off-topic opinion burning a hole in
your brainpan, feel free to add a comment.

______________________________

Nobody really knows what a human being is.
Nobody knows who he or she is either.
It is in that enigma that freedom exists.

– Lars Gustafsson

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I Watch Trees Sway – Poem for National Love A Tree Day

May 16th is National Love a Tree Day in the U.S.

Robert Frost (1874 – 1963) is one of the most celebrated American poets. He was born in San Francisco, but lived most of his life in the Eastern U.S., much of it in Vermont and Massachusetts. He published numerous volumes of poetry, and won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry four times: in 1924 for New Hampshire, for Collected Poems in 1931, for A Further Range in 1937, and in 1943 for A Witness Tree.

To read Frost’s poem “The Sound of the Trees” click

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A Poem for National Buttermilk Biscuit Day

May 14 is National Buttermilk Biscuit Day. Biscuits have been popular in America since before the U.S. Civil War. Alexander P. Ashbourne patented the first biscuit cutter in 1875.

Willa Schneberg (1952 – ) American interdisciplinary artist and poet, author of four poetry collections: In The Margins Of The World, winner of the 2002 Oregon Book Award; Box Poems; Storytelling In Cambodia; and Rending the Garment.

If you’d like to read Willa Schneberg’s poem “Biscuits” click:

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