TCS – September: Of Red Notes, Dissembling Breezes, and the True World’s Cold

Good Morning!

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Welcome to The Coffee Shop, just for you early risers
on Monday mornings. This is an Open Thread forum,
so if you have an off-topic opinion burning a hole in
your brainpan, feel free to add a comment.

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Another fall, another turned page: there was something of
jubilee in that annual autumnal beginning, as if last year’s
mistakes had been wiped clean by summer.”

— Wallace Stegner, Angle of Repose

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Afghan and Texan Women – More-Not-Less

by IRENE FOWLER, Contributor

Woman, thy names are:
Trouble, Temerity, Triumph!

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Good morning everyone and welcome.

Whatever your preferred flavour of life is – sweet, savoury, spicy or somethin’ else, welcome to the melting pot. I am on West African time, so ‘servez-vous.’

Even though we are helpless to change things on a macro scale, we can in our own small ways, align with love and the positive. As we contribute our quota, we are building towards a critical mass which can force change/s for good.

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The frightful Taliban-dominated landscape is fraught with land mines, which could blow up most, if not all, progress made in women’s autonomy, well-being and development in Afghanistan. The roles and value of women and the girl-child, in Afghan society writ-large, remains to be seen.

One hopes that the powers that be, will not create structures which cause women and girls to be viewed through the same lens, reserved for animate and inanimate chattel.

Meanwhile, the recent Texas State law, greatly impinging on women’s reproductive rights, should also cause serious concern for the application and efficacy of the rule of law. Alarm bells should ring, regardless of which camp one belongs to; pro-choice or otherwise. The Justice Department has filed a lawsuit against the State of Texas challenging the Bill. In  the words of Attorney-General Merrick Garland: “The Act is clearly unconstitutional under longstanding Supreme Court precedent.”


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TCS: Stand and Deliver – Poetry Out Loud

Good Morning!

______________________________

Welcome to The Coffee Shop, just for you early risers
on Monday mornings. This is an Open Thread forum,
so if you have an off-topic opinion burning a hole in
your brainpan, feel free to add a comment.

______________________________

You will find poetry nowhere unless
you bring some of it with you.
– Joseph Joubert

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The Greatest

by IRENE FOWLER, Contributor

“And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.” – 1 Corinthians 13.13

Good morning everyone and welcome.

Whatever your preferred flavour of life is – sweet, savoury, spicy or somethin’ else, welcome to the melting pot. I am on West African time, so ‘servez-vous.’

Even though we are helpless to change things on a macro scale, we can in our own small ways, align with love and the positive. As we contribute our quota, we are building towards a critical mass which can force change/s for good.

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Posted in Nigeria, Poetry | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

A Poem by Jack Prelutsky on His Birthday

Jack Prelutsky was born September 8, 1940, in Brooklyn, NY. American poet and singer-songwriter, most often writing for children, he has published over 50 poetry collections. Before becoming a writer, he worked odd jobs including driving a cab, moving furniture, busboy, potter, woodworker, and door-to-door salesman. Prelutsky was appointed as the first U.S. Children’s Laureate by the Poetry Foundation (2006-2008).

To read his poem “If Not for the Cat” click:

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TCS: Across a Cultural Cosmos – Three Poets

Good Morning!

______________________________

Welcome to The Coffee Shop, just for you early risers
on Monday mornings. This is an Open Thread forum,
so if you have an off-topic opinion burning a hole in
your brainpan, feel free to add a comment.

______________________________

“Looking out into the universe at night,
we make no comparisons between right
and wrong stars, nor between well and
badly arranged constellations.”

– Alan Watts

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A Poem for Newspaper Carrier Day

September 4th is Newspaper Carrier Day.

 In 1833, New York Sun editor Benjamin Day ran an ad for “steady men” to vend the paper. When 10-year-old Barney Flaherty applied for the job, he impressed Day, and was hired, becoming the first paperboy. His cry of “Paper! Get your paper, here!” became the universal pitch of boys – and some girls – hawking the news.

In 1899, the ‘newsies’ went on strike to change the deal that Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst’s newspapers had with their force of newsboys or newspaper hawkers, who had to buy the newspapers they then sold to the public. When the price to the newsboys went up, many people wouldn’t pay a higher price for the papers, so the newsboys were left with unsold papers, and couldn’t make a living. The strikers demonstrated across New York City for several days, effectively stopping circulation of the two papers, along with the news distribution for many New England cities. The strike lasted two weeks, causing Pulitzer’s New York World to decrease its circulation from 360,000 papers sold per day to 125,000. Although the price of papers was not lowered, the strike was successful in forcing the World and Journal to offer full buybacks to the newsies for unsold papers, allowing them to stay out of the red.


Stephen Crane (1871-1900) was an American poet, novelist, short story writer, and war correspondent. Prolific throughout his short life, he wrote notable works in the Realist tradition as well as early examples of American Naturalism and Impressionism. Regarded as one of the most innovative writers of his generation, today he is mostly remembered for The Red Badge of Courage. He was plagued by financial difficulties and ill health, and died of tuberculosis in a Black Forest sanatorium in Germany at the age of 28.

To read Stephen Crane’s poem “A Newspaper is a Collection of Half-Injustices” click:

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Summer Youth Camp With Denmark’s Princess Benedikte II

by IRENE FOWLER, Guest Blogger

The most common way people give up their
power is by thinking they don’t have any.
Alice Walker


Good morning everyone and welcome.

As a Director of a private secondary school for girls, in Nigeria, part of my responsibilities included overseeing enriching, character-building extra-curricular programs, beneficial to the holistic development of our students.

One of such programs was a school’s chapter of the National Girl Guides Association, which in turn, falls under the umbrella organization, known as the “World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS).” The ubiquitous, voluntary movement, which was founded by Lord Baden-Powell in 1928, is dedicated to girls and young women.

The body represents over 10 million women and girls from 150 countries. The mission of the empowering, female oriented initiative is “to enable girls and young women to develop their fullest potential as responsible citizens of the world.” https://www.wagggs.org/en/

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TCS: The Nigerian Connection and the Glory of Butterflies

Good Morning!

______________________________

Welcome to The Coffee Shop, just for you early risers
on Monday mornings. This is an Open Thread forum,
so if you have an off-topic opinion burning a hole in
your brainpan, feel free to add a comment.

______________________________

When I ran, I felt like a butterfly that was free.

– Wilma Rudolph

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Occasionally, a poem by artist Florine Stettheimer

Today is Florine Stettheimer’s day of birth.

Florine Stettheimer (1871–1944), American modernist painter, designer and poet; credited as the artist who painted the first feminist nude self-portrait; in the 1930s, she hosted a salon with her sisters that attracted members of the avant-garde in Manhattan, and where she exhibited her work. Stettheimer created the stage designs and costumes for Gertrude Stein and Virgil Thomson’s avant-garde opera, Four Saints in Three Acts. She is best known for her four monumental works illustrating what she considered to be New York City’s “Cathedrals”: Broadway, Wall Street, Fifth Avenue, and New York’s three major art museums.

To read Florine Stettheimer’s poem “Occasionally” click

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