Igor Volsky of ThinkProgress Provides Information about Some of the “Disgraceful Facts” That Were Buried in the Senate’s Torture Report

200px-CIA.svgPosted by Elaine Magliaro

Igor Volsky  has an informative post about the CIA torture report over at ThinkProgress titled 17 Disgraceful Facts Buried In The Senate’s 600 Page Torture Report.

Here are a few of the “disgraceful facts”:

2. CIA personnel objected to torture techniques, but were “instructed” by the CIA headquarters to continue.

“The non-stop use of the CIA’s enhanced interrogation techniques was disturbing to CIA personnel at DETENTION SITE GREEN. These CIA personnel objected to the continued use of the CIA’s enhanced interrogation techniques against Abu Zubaydah, but were instructed by CIA Headquarters to continue using the techniques…”Several on the team profoundly affected.. .some to the point of tears and choking up. [Page 473]

5. The CIA used rectal feeding on detainees.

“At least five CIA detainees were subjected to “rectal rehydration” or rectal feeding without documented medical necessity. …Majid Khan’s “lunch tray” consisting of hummus, pasta with sauce, nuts, and raisins was “pureed” and rectally infused. [Page 4]

15. The CIA tortured its own informants by accident.

“In the spring of 2004, after two detainees were transferred to CIA custody, CIA interrogators proposed, and CIA Headquarters approved, using the CIA’s enhanced interrogation techniques on one of the two detainees because it might cause the detainee to provide information that could identify inconsistencies in the other detainee’s story. After both detainees had spent approximately 24 hours shackled in the standing sleep deprivation position, CIA Headquarters confirmed that the detainees were former CIA sources. The two detainees had tried to contact the CIA on multiple occasions prior to their detention to inform the CIA of their activities and provide intelligence. [Page 133]

Click here to read 17 Disgraceful Facts Buried In The Senate’s 600 Page Torture Report.

 

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9 Responses to Igor Volsky of ThinkProgress Provides Information about Some of the “Disgraceful Facts” That Were Buried in the Senate’s Torture Report

  1. buckaroo says:

    Rectal feeding is a new one on me ? Who does this – I mean personal ? I all ways thought that the colon was for elimination only ? Sound a little fishy – would you not say unless Igor is A BIOLOGIST ?

  2. Mike Spindell says:

    “CIA personnel objected to torture techniques, but were “instructed” by the CIA headquarters to continue.”

    So at a war crimes trial like Nuremberg would they plead “I was only following orders.”?

  3. bigfatmike says:

    ” The CIA intentionally mislead the media to “shape public opinion.”

    There was a time when the CIA was supposed to take strong measures to prevent propaganda from undermining US news sources.

    It seems a reasonable conclusion that we are all now targets of our own intelligence services.

    How is a democracy supposed to work with our own intelligence services shaping the news?

    • Mike Spindell says:

      “How is a democracy supposed to work with our own intelligence services shaping the news?”

      BGM,

      I’m afraid it doesn’t work anymore.

  4. pete says:

    Majid Khan’s “lunch tray” consisting of hummus, pasta with sauce, nuts, and raisins was “pureed” and rectally infused.
    ====================================

    Too bad he missed thanksgiving. Maybe try one of those “turduckens”, a chicken stuffed into a duck, stuffed into a turkey, stuffed up…

  5. http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/12/09/inside-a-cia-dungeon.html “The CIA detainment and interrogation program can be, in many ways, told through the story of the hellhole the Cobalt site became: brutal techniques, little oversight, and unchecked abuse in the early years after 9/11, in the name of national security.

    One of the lead interrogators at Cobalt once said that it was an effective place for interrogations because it is the closest he has seen to a “dungeon.” Detainees who had been through the site, apparently in Afghanistan, called it the ‘Dark Prison,’ while the agency referred to it as the ‘Salt Pit.’

    The CIA was alerted of allegations that anal exams at Cobalt were conducted with “excessive force.” An attorney was asked to follow up, but no records indicate what happened next. Agency records said that one of the detainees housed at Cobalt, Mustafa al-Hawsawi, was later diagnosed with chronic hemorrhoids, an anal fissure, and symptomatic rectal prolapse.

    Nude prisoners were kept in a central area, and walked around as a form of humiliation. Detainees were hosed down while shackled naked, and placed in rooms with temperatures as low as 59 degrees Fahrenheit. Loud music was played constantly.”

  6. I downloaded the 2006 Army guidelines for human interrogation. Almost 400 pages of dense prose. I find Appendix M rather interesting. Once one gets past all the caveats about protecting human rights, it gets serious. As far as the caveats go, I am reading them as, “wink, wink, nudge, nudge.” I see what they are doing there.

  7. bettykath says:

    Considering their choice of people to be involved in the torture, it’s no wonder that there was creativity in the brutality.

    13. Some interrogators had previously admitted to sexual assault.

    “The Committee reviewed CIA records related to several CIA officers and contractors involved in the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program, most of whom conducted interrogations. The Committee identified a number of personnel whose backgrounds include notable derogatory information calling into question their eligibility for employment, their access to classified information, and their participation in CIA interrogation activities. In nearly all cases, the derogatory information was known to the CIA prior to the assignment of the CIA officers to the Detention and Interrogation Program. This group of officers included individuals who, among other issues, had engaged in inappropriate detainee interrogations, had workplace anger management issues, and had reportedly admitted to sexual assault.” [Page 59]

    It’s also notable that they had many instances of extracting false information.

  8. pete says:

    Chuck

    In a tactical situation I can see the need for it on a case by case basis (as in “who’s in the next room, how many and how are they armed”) but not as a national policy.

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