One Sentence Poems for Friday

One of my favorite poetry websites is One Sentence Poems, which does indeed publish only poems that consist of a single sentence. If you think that one-sentence poems wouldn’t have much meaning, or you even doubt they could actually be poetry, you’re in for a surprise.

A big ‘Thank You’ to editors Dale Wisely, Elizabeth McMunn-Tetangco and Tony Press for posting the best stuff.

There’s lots more to enjoy at the source: http://www.onesentencepoems.com/osp/

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Days

by Ion Corcos

As the days lengthen,
an eighty-year-old woman walks slowly
down the hill, turns eighty-one.

________________________________

At a Loss for Words

by Nancy Kay Peterson

I can’t describe
the sound
a slinky makes,
but I’d recognize it.

________________________________

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About Those True Believers

by J.R. Solonche

Do not be fooled
because they’re nice,

for they are the ones who
drug reason on the altar of faith,

the ones who truly practice
human sacrifice.

________________________________

Dances

by Judith Salcewicz 

When I watched the soaring,
the loops, the dives, and the promise
of the hawks’ mating dance,
I tried to remember
when our dancing stopped.

________________________________ 

How to Listen

by Alan Toltzis 

Cover your eyes
and listen to the wind,
not its complaints unsettling leaves
but its stillness—
an apology
murmuring through pin oaks
the moment it subsides.

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About wordcloud9

Nona Blyth Cloud has lived and worked in the Los Angeles area for the past 45 years, spending much of that time commuting on the 405 Freeway. After Hollywood failed to appreciate her genius for acting and directing, she began a second career managing non-profits, from which she has retired. Nona has now resumed writing whatever comes into her head, instead of reports and pleas for funding. She lives in a small house overrun by books with her wonderful husband and a bewildered Border Collie.
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