Mr. Conservative: Congressional Candidate from Minnesota Once Called Female Senators “Undeserving Bimbos in Tennis Shoes” and Disparaged Native Americans on His Blog

Jim Hagedorn

Jim Hagedorn

By Elaine Magliaro

Jim Hagedorn, the son of retired congressman Tom Hagedorn, was a “surprise victor” in last week’s Republican primary in Minnesota. The Star Tribune reported that Hagedorn “pulled off an upset in his party’s 1st District primary for Congress” when he beat Aaron Miller—the candidate who had been endorsed by the GOP. In November, Hagedorn will face off against Democrat Tim Walz, who is seeking his fifth term in Congress

Tim Murphy of Mother Jones said that Hagedorn “brings some serious baggage to his race against Walz…” Murphy said the Minnesota politics blog Bluestem Prairie had unearthed some posts that the GOP candidate had made on his old blog, Mr. Conservative. According to Murphy, Hagedorn “made light of American Indians, President Obama’s Kenyan ancestry, and female Supreme Court justices, among others, in ways many voters won’t appreciate.” Murphy added that Hagedorn had “deleted many of his old posts prior to his 2010 run for Walz’s seat—he lost in the GOP primary. But some of his writings can still be found via the Internet Archive or in screenshots taken by the Minnesota Independent.” Murphy continued by saying that Hagedorn’s posts “were not mere juvenile ramblings…” Hagedorn happened to be a Treasury Department official at the time that he wrote them.

Murphy provided examples of some of the comments that Hagedorn made about people that voters may not appreciate:

“Turns out half-aunt Zeituni is an illegal alien from Kenya who has illegally contributed money to her half-nephew’s campaign, which should make Americans half-pi$$ed,” he wrote in a typical missive during the 2008 election cycle. “The migration from Barack Obama’s second country to the United States during the next four years is going to look like a low-budget remake of Eddie Murphy’s hit comedy ‘Coming to America.'”

In one post, Murphy said that Hagedorn referred to former Wisconsin Sen. Herb Kohl as an “alleged switch-hitter” and a “packer.” He attacked a campaign ad for GOP candidate Mike Taylor when he ran against then-Senator Max Baucus. Hagedorn wrote: “[T]he ad really bent Taylor over with rage and caused him to go straight to the bar and get lubricated. It must have taken all Taylor’s power to refrain from fisting…err…using his fists on Max Baucus, or at the very least ream him inside and out.”

Back in 2002, the GOP congressional candidate from Minnesota “referred to Washington Democratic Sens. Maria Cantwell and Patty Murray as ‘undeserving bimbos in tennis shoes.’” Writing about former Bush White House counsel Harriet Miers in 2005, Hagedorn said that she had been nominated “to fill the bra of Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.”

Some of the most insulting posts Hagedorn wrote were about Native Americans.

Tim Murphy:

Writing about now-Sen. John Thune’s race against Democratic Sen. Tim Johnson, Hagedorn turned his razor-sharp wit on America’s most coddled demographic—Native Americans. “The race has been highlighted by a Democrat drive to register voters in several of several of South Dakota’s expansive redistribution of wealth centers…err…casino parlors…err…Indian reservations. Remarkably, many of the voters registered for absentee ballots were found to be chiefs and squaws who had returned to the spirit world many moons ago.” Alleging that fake votes from Indians would provide the margin of victory, he echoed “John Wayne’s wisdom of the only good Indian being a dead Indian.”

Hagedorn may have been joking. (The quip’s real author, General Philip Sheridan, wasn’t.) But American Indians were a favorite punching bag over at Mr. Conservative. In that same post, he referred to Nevada as a land of “nuclear waste and thankless Indians.” What made the state’s Native American population thankless? Hagedorn didn’t say.

The Associated Press reported on Saturday that Hagedorn was “standing by his years-old blog posts where he lambasted women, American Indians, gays and national political figures.”

Note: The Star Tribune reported that Hagedorn’s posts “were written between 2002 and 2008 on his now-defunct blog.

THIS JUST IN on Monday, August 25th at 10:05 AM EDT: GOP Congressional Candidate Apologizes for Calling Female Senators “Undeserving Bimbos” (Mother Jones)

SOURCES

House Candidate Called Female Senators “Undeserving Bimbos in Tennis Shoes”: Jim Hagedorn’s old blog, “Mr. Conservative,” is a ticking time bomb. (Mother Jones)

Rightwing values and performance art in MN-01: Mr. Quist and “Mr. Conservative” (Bluestem Prairie)

Web Archive (Mr. Conservative)

GOP U.S. House hopeful Jim Hagedorn defends old blog posts now under fire (StarTribune)

House GOP candidate: Female senators are “undeserving bimbos in tennis shoes”: The GOP’s Jim Hagedorn also derided American Indians, mocked the LGBTQ community, and insulted President Obama (Salon)

Congressional hopeful stands by old blog posts (AP/News Observer)

Hagedorn pulls off upset in 1st District; to face Walz in November (Star Tribune)

 

This entry was posted in Conservatives, Politics, United States and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

34 Responses to Mr. Conservative: Congressional Candidate from Minnesota Once Called Female Senators “Undeserving Bimbos in Tennis Shoes” and Disparaged Native Americans on His Blog

  1. blouise says:

    Well … Minnesota has a consistently high voter turnout when compared to other states and they have given us political figures ranging from Herbert Humphrey to Paul Wellstone to Jesse Ventura..

    Jim Hagedorn was the clear choice made by Republicans in their primary … he’s the one they want. Maybe he has enough in his campaign coffers to attract Sarah Palin.

  2. Elaine M. says:

    blouise,

    I’m sure he’ll be able to attract Palin; she attracts him. Here’s what he wrote about Caribou Barbie on his blog:

    Lest anyone challenge his bona fides, Hagedorn wanted to make abundantly clear he was a straight white male. “Senator McCain’s campaign was all but flat lined before he brought the feisty Caribou Barbie into our living rooms,” he wrote in 2008. “Which reminds me, on behalf of all red-blooded American men: THANK YOU SENATOR McCAIN, SARAH’S HOT!”

    *****
    The above excerpt was taken from the Mother Jones article.

    http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2014/08/minnesota-gop-congressional-candidate-jim-hagedorn-mr-conservative-blog-tim-walz

  3. blouise says:

    Elaine,

    Well, there ya go … a boner-fied Palinite.

    Now one could take his razor-sharp wit concerning Native Americans in many different ways but no matter how you look at it, an actual living Native American might want to go into hiding if the Republicans get their way and put this sterling example of conservatism in office.

  4. blouise says:

    Has he requested urine donations yet?

  5. swarthmoremom says:

    Another Tea party upset… He probably won because he has a very recognizable name as his father was a fairly well liked moderate republican.

  6. Tony C. says:

    I seriously think primary wins by morons like this just make it more likely the Democrats will win in the general. I’m not sure an easy win for the Democrats is always a good thing; but I think that is what happens.

  7. blouise says:

    SwM,

    Name recognition didn’t help him before … what was it about the GOP’s candidate this time that the voters didn’t like? I mean, this guy is seriously screwy. (If Elaine put it in her post, I missed it.)

  8. blouise says:

    Tony,

    Certainly, and the Party knows this which is why he didn’t get their backing.

    The Party also knows it’s riddled with people who are more than willing to cut off their noses to spite their faces.

  9. Elaine M. says:

    blouise,

    I just found this:

    Analysis: Hagedorn went west for primary win
    Posted: Saturday, August 16, 2014 3:34 pm
    By Josh Moniz jmoniz@mankatofreepress.com
    http://www.mankatofreepress.com/news/local_news/article_03226713-4fe3-51c1-b9f5-d95372464e9e.html

    Excerpt:
    MANKATO — There is a saying: All politics are local.

    Republican candidate Jim Hagedorn won the Minnesota 1st Congressional District primary Tuesday because he dominated the small western counties and two school bond referendums boosted voter turnout in his key districts.

    Blue Earth resident Hagedorn won 54 percent of the votes compared to Byron resident Miller’s 46 percent. Miller only won six of the approximately 21 counties by mostly small margins, including Olmsted County, crucial in his plan. The overall primary turnout was low enough that Hagedorn only received about 1,800 more votes than Miller to secure his victory.

    Generally speaking, the population of the counties in the district increase from west to east. The exceptions are Blue Earth County and Olmsted County (Rochester), which is three times the size of Blue Earth County.

    School referendums

    About 1,500 more Republican voters turned out in Brown County than in the 2012 primary, the bulk of that in New Ulm. Blue Earth County had about 600 more Republican voters than the 2012 primary. There were school bond referendums in each county — Lake Crystal Wellcome Memorial and New Ulm — and the New Ulm measure passed narrowly.

  10. swarthmoremom says:

    http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/aaron-millers-minnesota-platform Aaron Miller is a creationist with a weird platform. The Minnesota Republican Party has very little going for it these days. That was not always the case.

  11. blouise says:

    Elaine and SwM,

    Okay … now it makes a little more sense. Thanx

  12. pete says:

    blouise@11:25a.m.
    Elaine,

    Well, there ya go … a boner-fied Palinite.
    ================================

    thanks, blouise. I needed that one.

  13. blouise says:

    pete,

    We share the same sense of humor.

    I trust all is still good with your heart. Tex is looking at heart surgery in Sept. and I’m very nervous about it as he is high- high risk.

    Think of you often.

  14. Tony C. says:

    blouise: The Party also knows it’s riddled with people who are more than willing to cut off their noses to spite their faces.

    Although I think those Tea Party people have an idiotic ideology, I do not regard their strategy as self-harmful, and in fact as a strategy I find it courageous and admirable to (metaphorically) fight each battle to the death, even if it is their own. I wish the socially liberal, financially socialist Democrats would follow suit with their own rebellion.

    The Tea Partiers have (in my view undeniably) forced the Republican party to do more than just pay lip service to their agenda. They are a disruptive force in the Republican party. They are not “harming their own” as cutting off one’s nose implies, they are trying to drive out the “big government” Republicans in the name of what they regard as purity and freedom. That has had an effect, even as they lose one political battle after another, sometimes to Democrats, the Republican party has become noticeably more “Tea Party” because of those pitched battles, and to my knowledge there are no more “moderate” Republicans or anybody talking about “compromise” or a middle ground.

    Republicans throughout Congress are anxious to appease Tea Party constituents. That is a direct result of the Tea Party’s rejection of the “lesser of two evils” axiom and their rejection of voting for the “most electable” candidate. The fear of the Tea Party in Congress is a direct result of the Tea Party’s willingness to “bet it all” and lose the seat to a Democrat before accepting a moderate Republican, and they have proven that time and again so Republican’s believe their seat is truly at risk if they so much as express doubt about a Tea Party plank.

    The Tea Party tends to run under the Republican banner, but they are their own party mounting a revolution in the Republican brand from the inside. Moderate and corrupt beltway Republicans are their enemy, and they are willing to take a loss to drive them out of politics and wait as many election cycles as it takes to fill the seat with a Tea Party faithful, even if the seat gets (temporarily, in their eyes) filled by a Democrat.

    That stubborn, extremist, no compromise, suicidal “all or nothing” strategy is actually working. The Democrats “lesser of two evils” axiom that leads to an “always vote for the Democrat no matter how corrupt or Republican or corporatist they act” fear-based voting strategy is defenseless against it.

    Like it or not, the Tea Party’s “all or nothing” strategy is working and is the reason Congress is dead-locked except for an increasing propensity to cut socially beneficial budgets and programs, and the reason Red States are preventing the care of their poor and elderly.

  15. blouise says:

    Tony,

    Okay, if we are going to argue the pros and cons of the Tea Party then I am going to do my best to stay away from “cheap shots” against the group and give you my assessment based on my interactions with several of their members. I have also read more than a few books and articles on the subject and will point you to one in particular, ” “The Rise of the Tea Party: Corporate Media and Political Discontent in the Age of Obama”” by Anthony DiMaggio (the book combines media, public opinion, and movements—together, examining the Tea Party as a conglomeration of interest groups, and measuring how they have influenced media coverage and public opinion)

    DiMaggio does a fairly good job analyzing the modern day garb of the Tea Party but I’m more interested in the roots of the Tea Party, that from whence it sprung, for it is those roots that supplied the life blood for all the future mutations of the plant.

    Way back in In 1984, Ron Paul, during his early terms in Congress as a Representative from Texas, became the first chairman of the Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE), which is a conservative political group founded by David H. Koch and Charles G. Koch “to fight for less government, lower taxes, and less regulation.” CSE founded the Tea Party movement in 2002, but it did not catch on. It was then that I first became aware of the Tea Party movement as my neighbor joined in late 2002.

    In 2004, Citizens for a Sound Economy split into two new organizations, with Citizens for a Sound Economy being renamed as FreedomWorks, and Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation becoming Americans for Prosperity. The two organizations would become key players in the Tea Party movement from 2009 onward.

    It is also important to note that Ron Paul decided to enter politics after the “Nixon Shock” … the financial decision to cancel the direct convertibility of the United States dollar to gold.

    You may wonder why I interject the Nixon Shock but it is part and parcel of the Paul/Koch Brothers decision to “take back” their government and thus part of the root system that anchors the present day Tea Party.

    The Tea Party stayed on the fringes during the early 2000’s and Bush’s Presidency but I can guarantee you that the members during those early years were pure … they despised Bush and his Iraq War and were, at least from my observation of my neighbor and his friends, predominately white male, age 40-50, middle class and working. But … the economic explosion that so enriched large corporations, banks, and dot com startups was passing them by. Their middle-class income was not growing, in fact, it was shrinking as single income families found that double incomes were now a necessity … and then in 2008 a god dam n… got the top spot. The Tea Party came out of incubation and bloomed in 2009. Why?

    Because the Republicans needed the Tea Partiers’ rage to fight Obama.

    The rage is real, perhaps even justifiable given the economic realities, but it is, as in the case of most raw emotion, easily manipulated and the roots of the Tea Party is a system intricately woven by the Koch Brothers and their handy political man on the scene … Ron Paul.

    The Tea Party members are pawns serving the interests of the Republican Party … always have been, always will be.

    Have you ever had any experience with the Jesuit order as teachers? They are brilliant in many ways and one is the manipulation of college age students. They tell the students they have “freedom” but if one looks closely, there are a lot of rules. Freedom is an illusion.

    That’s the Tea Party in the Republican Party … allowed to think they are bringing change, even permitted to elect a few crazies who then, of course, can be blamed for the, ahem, grid-lock.

  16. blouise says:

    … p.s. The 40-50 year-old group of predominantly middle-class white men that denominated the Tea Party in the early 2000’s was joined by what would have been called “disenfranchised” Southern Democrats who had fled the Democratic Party when Johnson betrayed them with Civil Rights. They were an addition that the Koch/Paul’s Tea Party badly needed to fuel the rage necessary after Obama’s election and increase the appeal of the party first established in 2002. The morphing from economic rage to race rage serves the Republican establishment quite well. They encourage them to think of themselves as rebels … it’s an age old manipulation that the Jesuits have used for centuries … just look at the new Pope … he’s really good at it. 😉

  17. pete says:

    the 40-50 y/o group are what Pat Buchanan always refers to as the “Reagan Democrats”. During the 70’s in Alabama they were all Democrats, by the 90’s none would admit to ever having been anything but Republicans.
    I’ll use Fob as an example.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fob_James

    and in the south there is definitely a racial tinge to their views and their anger/hate. I have relatives there, I see what they post on facebook.

  18. Tony C. says:

    blouise: Okay, I will defer to your expertise on the history of it. I am talking about the strategy in use, as I said, it works. I do not think the Republicans are still in control of the Tea Party, they have lost elections and lost seats held by Congressmen with decades long careers as a result. That doesn’t sound like “control” to me. The Tea Party has, in many instances, primary-ed sitting Congressmen and caused them to expend campaign funds and focus so far to the right they have lost their seats, that doesn’t sound like “control.”

    In such primaries the GOP endorsed and financially supported candidates lose; look at Dave Brat defeating the House Majority Leader Eric Cantor; who outspent Brat 40 to 1. “Brat received support from, and gave credit for his win to local Tea Party groups in Virginia”. Do we really think the Republican Party threw Eric Cantor under the bus by giving him millions of dollars and endorsing him in the primary? If so, I’d switch parties if they’d promise to throw me under the bus. Otherwise, the Tea Party is a gun that fires at random and occasionally kills off a family member, it is a very dangerous tool for the Republican Party to own. But to be clear I do not think the Republicans control the grass roots level; I think the sociopath Newt Gingrich hijacked the brand name but not the underlying movement.

    The “all or nothing” rabid extremism strategy works, no matter who devised it. I think it is a grass-roots phenomenon; collect a cadre of rabidly extreme ideologues and that is what they are going to do, vote rabidly extreme.

  19. swarthmoremom says:

    Tony, The tea party is still largely a southern phenomenon.

  20. Elaine M. says:

    Swarthmoremom,

    I’d add that the Tea Party is a Koch-backed phenomenon.

  21. Elaine M. says:

    David Koch Seeded Major Tea-Party Group, Private Donor List Reveals
    Exclusive tax documents confirm the conservative billionaire provided start-up funds for Americans for Prosperity.
    BY ALEX SEITZ-WALD
    http://www.nationaljournal.com/politics/david-koch-seeded-major-tea-party-group-private-donor-list-reveals-20130924

  22. Elaine M. says:

    David Koch – Evidence Of Direct Tea Party Link
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0JjQxPJOAfg

  23. swarthmoremom says:

    http://www.bluestemprairie.com/bluestemprairie/randy-demmer/ Blue stem prairie is blogger in rural lMinnesota. She has been on the Hagedorn case for a while.

  24. Mike Spindell says:

    The “Tea Party” has never been a “grass-roots” movement as I wrote about in 2011 at RIL http://jonathanturley.org/2011/08/02/tea-party-and-the-myth-of-a-grassroots-movement/#more-38049 and then again in 2013 http://jonathanturley.org/2013/02/16/tea-party-a-phony-movement-mantled-as-legitimate/ .

    When we see certain “establishment Republicans” like Sheldon Kantor defeated is merely the interplay of the ruling oligarchs. The Koch Bros. represent one set of corporate oligarchs, while people like the Bush’s represent another. It’s all about a battle for control between competing self interests.

  25. Tony C. says:

    Mike: I don’t think that is true; Dave Brat is a self-styled Tea Party candidate, a professor that took almost no donations and defeated Eric Cantor by talking and spending less than $200,000. As far as I can tell there is not a single Oligarch backing Dave Brat, and Cantor outspent Brat 40 to 1, so about $8M was spent. Oligarchs may have been on Cantor’s side, the Republican Party was on his side, he’s speaker of the House for goodness sake. Oops, I meant for evil’s sake.

    Anyway, Brat is not a one-off phenomenon. I believe the Tea Party did begin as a grassroots movement, but whether it did or not, it is a grassroots movement now, there are many people that got Brat elected and weren’t following any orders from any Oligarch, he does not appear to be on anybody’s side except the side of the moronically angry.

    The only way the oligarch’s can fight is with money and the corruption in Congress that money can buy, through financing campaigns with or without Citizen’s United. I see no evidence of those tracks in the Brat campaign, and I think the only answer left for unseating Cantor is a grass roots, word-of-mouth, anti-incumbent movement in Virginia.

  26. swarthmoremom says:

    Tony, Now that Brat won they will back him. Do you think they are going to back the hippie democrat that is running against him? Most tea partyers back the Citizen’s United decision.

  27. swarthmoremom says:

    http://crooksandliars.com/2014/06/david-brat-represents-taliban-insurgency “Brat’s Stealth Dark Money Machine

    The media is making it seem like Brat was some sort of underdog, but in reality, he’s strapped to the hilt with billionaire support and billionaire money.

    In fact, you could argue that he pretty much owes his job to people like the Koch brothers and their cronies. John Allison, the former CEO of BB&T bank and the current head of the Koch-founded Cato Institute, gave Brat’s college a $500,000 fellowship back in 2010 so he could teach Ayn Rand and libertarianism at Randolph Macon University. Like hundreds of other college professors across the country these days, David Brat is really just a bought-and-paid-for shill of Charles and David Koch and their buddies.

    The Kochs and their network have been funding academic institutions for years, most notably George Mason University’s Mercatus Center, because they knew they had to bring up young academics in their libertarian money tradition in order to fully realize their political ambitions.

    Brat’s campaign manager, 23-year old Zachary Werrell, cut his political teeth at Ron Paul’s Campaign for Liberty, which is closely affiliated with Americans for Prosperity and the Kochtopus. His treasurer is Steven D’Ambrosia, an executive with Altria Corporation.
    Free advertising, via right-wing talkers

    Most significantly, Brat received the full support of the conservative messaging machine, from churches to right-wing talk radio hosts like Laura Ingraham and Mark Levin.

    Over the past few months, right-wing talkers like Laura Ingraham and Mark Levin have been pushing Brat and attacking Cantor non-stop on their radio shows. Ingraham even went so far as to say that she wished that President Obama traded Eric Cantor to the Taliban in exchange for Bowe Bergdahl.

  28. blouise says:

    Tony C

    Politics is a cut-throat business. Cantor got the funds and couldn’t hold the seat so now he’s somewhere in the party hierarchy directing someone else s race. This happens all the time and is nothing new to politicians. His departure from Congress means that Cantor won’t have to disclose any companies or firms with whom he may be negotiating for a job

    The following is important … very important

    Cantor lost but the populist Tea Party doesn’t have anyone to put up to run for the vacant #2 spot. They simply don’t have the votes because these Tea Party dudes talk loud, enjoy going on the radio but aren’t known for putting in the actual mileage that it takes to become a top leader. The Party put in their own “business” guy. Brat will be easy to control and marginalize just like the rest of them. The Tea Party keeps the rage going and gets the angry white man off the couch and to the polls … if the Party has to take in a few Joe the Plumbers, that’s okay … they eat guys like that for breakfast in D C

    It really is a fantasy to think the Tea Party has any real impact besides feeding the angry white man’s rage.

  29. Elaine M. says:

    swarthmoremom,

    The Dark Money that Beat Eric Cantor

  30. blouise says:

    And, Tony … As to feeding the angry white man’s rage … somebody has to do it because they are a voting block and the Republicans are stuck with ’em.

    The Dems have plenty of angry women, angry blacks, angry Hispanics, and angry Asians … they don’t need or want the angry white man. The Democrats will settle for the rational white man … especially the young ones.

  31. Tony C. says:

    Swarthmore, Elaine: I watched that video, I still don’t buy it. Brat was not a “hand-picked” Koch sucker, funding an endowment at a college isn’t giving him campaign money, and is not buying ads promoting him as a campaign.

    If anything, the Koch’s funding talk radio to unseat Eric Cantor is proof positive the Koch’s are NOT the same as the Republican Party, which means the Tea Party they are funding is not the same as the Republican Party, because the Republican Party had Cantor in a powerful position, that the new Republican, Brat, is NOT going to fill.

    The video provides more proof that the Tea Party (Ayn Rand, hard core Libertarian, no government, no regulation) is being nurtured by the Koch Brothers as a separate entity from the Republican Party with different goals. The Dark Money may well be there (making me wrong about the underdog status) but the purpose is not to promote the Republican Party, it is to promote the Koch Libertarian party and take over the Republican Party from within.

    I think they are two different things. The Tea Party is not controlled by the Republican Party, it sounds like it is controlled by the Kochs with an Aynish, Libertarian agenda.

  32. Oky1 says:

    Some of you people are going I nice job & I’m recoginzing it right here.

    OT: (Blouise, I’m pulling for you & Rex next month, I’ve family, I understand. btw, skip the video below it’s not directed for you, but others.)

    But this job is bigger then any one of us can handle without cooperation of others that care about freedom/liberty/humanity.

  33. swarthmoremom says:

    http://www.politico.com/story/2014/08/afp-summit-koch-2016-elections-110475.html?hp=t1“DALLAS – “Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, Mike Pence, Rick Perry and Ben Carson all sounded like presidential candidates in weekend speeches to conservative activists here for a conference organized by an influential Koch-backed group.

    The would-be candidates touted their small-government bona fides and hammered prospective Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama on issues ranging from the Middle East to health care to Obama’s golfing.

    Cruz and Perry got among the lustiest responses from the nearly 3,000 grassroots activists at Americans for Prosperity’s annual Defending the American Dream summit. But Paul and Pence, who on Thursday night dined privately with a more exclusive group of major donors and VIPs including AFP foundation chairman David Koch and columnist George Will, appear to have made the best impressions on the elite and moneyed class.

    Now in its eighth year, the AFP summit has become an increasingly important stop for aspiring GOP presidential candidates since the Kochs’ robust political network, which spent more than $400 million in the run-up to the 2012 election, has emerged as a preeminent force in conservative politics.

    This year’s meeting featured a mix of hands-on training (breakout sessions on social media, phone-banking and converting liberal relatives were well-attended), fun (a mechanical bull was a big hit), private meetings and whip-up-the-base speeches from big names.

    It also, however, exposed some potential fault lines, both among prospective candidates and between the Kochs’ brand of libertarian-infused conservatism, social conservatism and hawkish national security conservatism.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.