Memes of a feather: ‘radical Islamic terrorism’ and ‘radical Christian terrorism’

Immanuel Kant — ‘Out of the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing was ever made.’

 

By ann summers

Home-grown extremism still intersects and is intersectional, so expressing “radical islamic terrorism” like “radical Christian terrorism” are as PBO indicated today about political talking points, there’s no magic; it’s not a strategy.

In fact armed patriarchy as a kind of conflicted and gendered magical thinking may be more at the root of global terror and it’s more about mental health in a society more interested in political power and private profit than public safety and health.

Charleston Shooting

Orlando’s massacre as the “worst mass shooting in US history should not be a lede for the Guinness Book considering that it does not eclipse the same problems presented in the Newtown shootings among so many other “less worse” events. What is important is the degree of delusional ideology and ideation at work in every case, some mediated, others less so.

Remember the Pam Geller wannebee curating the Prophet art show from his pickup bed winding up in the Eastern Oregon wildlife refuge. His hope was to attract anti-blasphemic Islamic terrorists, and yet he now is in custody in part related to the Bundy-based siege.

ritzheimer.jpg

 

Commonalities of violence and mental illness and ultimately the projection of gendered force in one case sexuality, in another patriarchy, in both cases with racialism.

ExtremistKillings2015Table2a_1_.jpg

 

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This entry was posted in 9-11, Barack Obama, Christianity, Criminal Law, DHS, FBI, Florida, Fundamentalism, Government, Homeland Security, Homosexual Rights, Immigrants, Immigration, Islam, Law Enforcement, Media, Mental Health, Murder, Political Science, Politics, Propaganda, Racism, Reproductive Rights, Terrorism, Terrorists, Uncategorized, War on "Terror" and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Memes of a feather: ‘radical Islamic terrorism’ and ‘radical Christian terrorism’

  1. Thank you, Ann. Another aspect to the term “radical Islam” played out over the last couple days.

    Trump said something about the President not using the term “radical Islam” in his address on the Orlando shootings. I’m not going to try to find video, but the gist of it is covered in the articles liked below.

    On Monday, Clinton responded – http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/13/politics/hillary-clinton-donald-trump-orlando-attacks-reaction/

    On Tuesday (today), President Obama weighed in, and his comments are framed as a response to what Trump had said, but surely he also knew by then what Clinton had said – http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/14/politics/obama-pushes-back-against-criticism-over-terrorism-rhetoric/

  2. I don’t have a problem with “religious extremism” but do have a problem when a specific religion is named. We have had just about as many killings by so-called “christian” extremists as we have by Islamic extremists. For that matter, Jewish extremists as well. Killing is killing. Radical fringe nutcases come in every flavor, color and description. Case in point is that preacher (claims to be Baptist) in California who is dancing on the dead bodies of the murdered in Orlando. Gloating about murdered young people, the youngest being a 20-year-old student working on her RN degree.That is so sick it doesn’t even have a name.

    When is the Drumpf, or the other mainstream candidates for that matter, going to call these people out for what they are? “I am right to life, so let’s go kill some doctors and nurses.” Yeah, right.

    I won’t hold my breath.

  3. David says:

    I heard on NPR as I was waking up that many people who fell under the influence of ISIS had issues with their sexuality. I remember reading that many members of domestic far right wing groups (including terrorists) later turn out to have various related issues around their sexuality. It seems that the common thread is that people who hate part of themselves will wrap themselves in ideologies that allow them to deny the part of them that they hate and project it onto others.
    Any religion can breed extremism, even Buddhism (the 969 Movement in Burma is an example).
    I wish I had some kind of answer but I don’t.

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